19 Scheduling your future

You might find it a bit scary thinking about your future. You might be tempted to procrastinate making important decisions about your future, see figure 19.1. There is a risk of getting stuck in a do-nothing or busy waiting loop. This guidebook is here to help you break out of that loop. One way to breakout of an unproductive loop is to schedule some time every week where you work on personal development and job applications. Doing good applications takes time and you’ll probably find you can’t do as many applications as you might like.

The biggest waste of time is the time spent not getting started on a project. Your future might seem big and unknown but it’s really not as scary as you might think and getting started can be surprisingly enjoyable. New Project? Every time… by Visual Thinkery is licenced under CC-BY-ND

Figure 19.1: The biggest waste of time is the time spent not getting started on a project. Your future might seem big and unknown but it’s really not as scary as you might think and getting started can be surprisingly enjoyable. New Project? Every time… by Visual Thinkery is licenced under CC-BY-ND

If you’re a University of Manchester student, the live Coding your Future (COMP2CARS) workshops sessions are also here to help. COMP2CARS complements the second year tutorials (COMP2TUT) at the University of Manchester and takes place in the same slot as COMP2TUT when you meet your personal tutor. See your timetable at timetables.manchester.ac.uk.

For small group sessions and one-to-one meetings with your tutor, if you are not please turn your camera on, see section 19.12.

19.1 MONDAYS AT MIDDAY

19.2 Week 3: Debugging & Hacking

Monday 11th October at midday:

19.3 Week 4: Finding & Nurturing

Monday 18th October at midday:

  • Finding your Future and Nurturing your future, Job searching and health, happiness, anxiety and depression. Lecture and workshop in Engineering Building A, Lecture Theatre B, see timetables.manchester.ac.uk. Why should you take your mental and physical health more seriously? Read chapters 8 and 3.

19.4 Week 5: Knowing

Monday 25th October at midday:

  • Knowing your future read chapter 2: How well do you know yourself? Lecture and workshop in Engineering Building A, Lecture Theatre B, see timetables.manchester.ac.uk. What are your unique talents (superpowers) and where is your achilles heel (weakness)? What are you doing to improve both sets of skills?

19.5 Week 6: Pausing

Monday 1st November at midday:

  • Reading week, take a breather or catchup. No workshop.

19.6 Week 7: Writing

Monday 8th November at midday:

19.7 Week 8: Writing

Monday 15th November at midday:

19.8 Week 9: Broadening

Monday 22nd November at midday:

  • Broadening your future: expanding your job search, what are the options. Read chapter 9
  • Achieving your future: providing evidence of your achievements, read chapter 12

19.9 Week 10: Speaking

Monday 29th November at midday:

19.10 Week 11: Meeting

Monday 6th December at midday:

19.11 Week 12: Meeting

Monday 13th December at midday:

19.12 Cameras on or off?

We would normally expect participants in small meetings (not large ones like lectures) to turn their cameras on but we understand that there are good reasons why people may not be willing/able to and won’t explicitly ask you to.

19.12.1 Why turn cameras on?

There has always been a question around whether to turn cameras on during online meetings but it is even more obvious with online meetings becoming the norm rather than the exception. There is a direct benefit in using cameras in small, personal meetings where many of us make use of visual cues to aid the flow of conversation – at the very least it’s easier to identify who is talking. Additionally, it can help people get along – people might feel more ‘listened to’ if they can see somebody listening and your team will find it easier to remember names etc if they have a face to match the names to.

19.12.2 Why not?

There are lots of reasons why not. Most obviously, if you don’t have access to a camera. But you may also be in an environment which you prefer others not to see, you may have anxiety around the issue, or your connection might be too slow. There are many other perfectly reasonable reasons for you not to put your camera on and you should not feel pressured to do this. If you simply say “Sorry, I can’t turn my camera on today” then nobody will ask any further and they should never explicitly ask you to turn it on.

19.12.3 Being appropriate

You should already be treating online meetings like physical ones e.g. turning up on time, being prepared, listening, engaging etc. Similarly, if people can see you then you should ensure you are wearing appropriate clothes (wearing clothes is the absolute minimum here!) and in an appropriate place (the bathroom is probably not appropriate) as you would for a physical meeting.

19.12.4 Respecting others

If other people have decided to turn their cameras on then we ask that you show them respect by not recording anything without their explicit permission. We won’t touch on the legality of this as we believe that basic respect for each other should be enough to prevent any issues. You will take part in larger meetings where recording may be standard and in such cases this should be made explicit.

(Thanks to Giles Reger and Sarah Clinch for the text above)